True Solidarity: Moving Past Privilege Guilt

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Jamie Utt explains that if privilege guilt prevents us from acting against oppression, then it is simply another tool of oppression.

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I remember well when I was first confronted with my privilege.

I had just started college, and some activists called me out on the ways in which my class and race privilege were showing up in the classroom as well as in activist spaces.

Of course I was indignant. “I’m not privileged! I work hard for everything I have!”

And while I did indeed work hard, that assertion is obviously laughable.

There are all sorts of aspects of my identity that afford me privilege: my race, my gender, my religious upbringing, my intergenerational wealth, my ability, and on and on.

But that didn’t make it any easier for me to hear, and as I realized they were right, I fell into a bit of depression, carrying tremendous guilt and struggling to understand how this could be true.

I felt as if I was a bad person simply for being who I am, and I was trapped in shame.

I’m a racist, classist, sexist, ableist homophobe who is ruining everything everywhere.” Yeah, it’s a little dramatic, but it’s honestly reflective of how I felt.

In the midst of my wrestling with this guilt and inertia, I noticed a quote on the dorm room wall of a girl I was totes crushing on:

QuotePic

I didn’t think much of it the first time I saw it. Or the second time. But since I was hanging around in her room a lot, the quote kept showing up for me, and after a while, it really hit me.

I had to find a way to move out of guilt if I wanted to make a difference.

In time I came to realize that if privilege guilt prevents me from acting against oppression, then it is simply another tool of oppression, and sitting in guilt means further colluding with the system that is making me feel shame.

In turn, we have to find a way to move through or past guilt and toward action against oppression.

And though the process of overcoming privilege guilt must inevitably be intensely personal, there are approaches to ending feelings of guilt that all people of privilege can take.

Approaches to Moving Through or Past Privilege Guilt

1. Self-Reflect

If you’re struggling with shame about your identity and your privilege, that guilt is rooted somewhere, and understanding those roots is important.

Is your guilt coming from your active collusion in oppression? Is it rooted in past action? Is it rooted in feelings of powerlessness about the big-picture problems of oppression?

Without a strong understanding of where our guilt comes from, it is impossible to overcome guilt and accountably act for social justice.

After all, if our guilt is rooted in past oppressive actions, knowing so allows us to forgive ourselves and, perhaps, apologize to others for our hurtful behavior so that we can move forward.

If our guilt stems from our own collusion with oppression, lacking such awareness will only lead to “White knighting,” a term I use as a catchall for acting for or on behalf of those we wish to help. Having knowledge of our own collusion, then, allows us to begin to take steps toward solidarity.

2. Understand and Accept Your Role in Oppression

In my own experience, I’ve found that privilege guilt seems strongest in those who say things like “I’ve never personally owned a slave, and I just feel sick about racism that exists today! But why should I be held responsible for things that happened in the past if I care about making the world better?”

In the end, all this attitude allows is for the person speaking to ignore the ways in which their privilege actually makes them responsible for injustice and oppression.

And as such, it is no solution for privilege guilt.

On the other hand, understanding the fundamental ways in which I, as a person of privilege, collude with oppression every day, empowers me to act.

After all, if I am aware of the ways in which I contribute to oppression in my daily life, I can seek the knowledge and understanding I need to act for change in ways that might actually have an impact.

Simultaneously, the lack of understanding of our own collusion in oppression leads to action that lacks accountability. For example, if that #FitchtheHomeless dude had considered the ways that his little “campaign” would actually further the oppression of people experiencing homelessness, he might have reconsidered his choice of action.

Much of the time, when people are asking you to “check your privilege,” they are not telling you that you should feel guilt about your identity.

They are simply asking you to consider the ways that your words or actions are furthering oppression so that you can act differently.

3. Recognize that Knowledge of Privilege is not Enough

For a lot of people of privilege, the initial realization of their position in society is huge, even devastating. For me, it was shocking (sadly), and it led to a lot of self-doubt and guilt.

And then a professor and mentor woke me up. He said:

“The fact that you’ve inherited privilege and an oppressive system is not your fault. You should not feel guilty about that.  But if you understand your privilege and that you participate in oppression and do nothing, then you have plenty to feel guilt about.”

Action, specifically action that is grounded in accountability and community, is vital to moving through and past privilege guilt.  So long as we only acknowledge our privilege, we can get stuck in a cycle of inertia and self-doubt.

Actively working for justice as part of a movement, one where we listen and learn to make certain our action is needed and wanted, is not only healing, but it is vital to ensuring that we transcend guilt.

As we move toward action, though, we need to understand the distinction between acting for or acting on behalf of as opposed to acting with and in solidarity across difference.

One of my biggest pet peeves is when I hear people of privilege say that they plan to “use their privilege to help [insert oppressed group].”

While privilege can sometimes be leveraged as part of action, to see our privilege as something we can use to help only recreates and reinforces the very systems of oppression we claim to oppose.

To recreate the system of identity privilege, even as we seek to “help,” ensures that our action remains marginal and irrelevant at best or oppressive and marginalizing at worst.

Instead, we need to think of ways that we can step back or create space. Mia McKenzie talks about this some in her piece 4 Ways to Push Back Against Your Privilege.

And we must take those ideas and expand upon them, finding ways that work within our daily lives and our communities that allow us to move beyond knowledge of privilege and into concerted action against oppression.

4. Participate In and/or Create Community Acting for Justice

A sure-fire way to ensure one remains stuck in a place of shame about privilege is to wallow alone or simply spend time with those who do not much care to talk about privilege and oppression. Sure, distractions work for a while, but the guilt inevitably comes creeping back in.

And action, when done alone, is unlikely to be either accountable or effective. Thus, we must act in community, joining the chorus of voices working to overturn systems of oppression.

In some cases, that means finding ways to participate in those communities that already exist.

When spaces are open to those striving to be allies (keep in mind that not all spaces will or should welcome people of privilege), show up.

Listen, offer to help in ways that take the lead from the marginalized and oppressed, and use your skills to help the cause.  In doing so, though, be aware of the space you occupy and the amount of energy you demand of others.

Other times, you may have to foster and create community, yourself.

Start discussions with people who share your privileges, and call them into the work you are doing.  Find ways to support and to be supported by people who share your identity, in part because you can better understand each other’s experience and in part so that you don’t need to draw energy from those to whom you are working to be an ally.

Regardless, participating in community is vital for holding oneself accountable and for learning and growing. 

But within that community, it is also important to understand the difference between being an ally and friendship.  Sometimes friends can be allies, and allies can be friends.  Other times someone may need an ally but have no interest in your friendship.  Recognizing that those two words, ally and friend, are not synonyms is important for acting effectively in solidarity.

5. Stay in Touch with Why You Feel Guilty

As you move through and past privilege guilt, it’s important to never let it fade too far from your memory and experience.  After all, you felt guilty for a reason.

Keeping the reasons for your guilty feelings close can help make you less likely to collude with oppression moving forward, but it can also help you understand why you choose to act against oppression.

Staying in touch with our guilt is important for making sure that our action isn’t paternalistic, that we’re not acting just to relieve our feelings of shame. 

Instead, when we know why we were feeling privilege guilt, we can better ensure that our action is one of true solidarity, one reflective of the words of Aboriginal Elder Lila Watson:

“If you’ve come here to help me, you’re wasting your time. But if you’ve come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

By knowing, understanding, and holding onto the why of our guilt, we are better able to remember that we have a responsibility to act.

After all, “guilt is a luxury we can no longer afford.” And we are all responsible for moving past it and toward a world of justice.

Originally appeared at Everyday Feminism

Jamie Utt is a Contributing Writer at Everyday Feminism. He is the Founder and Director of Education at CivilSchools, a comprehensive bullying prevention program, a diversity and inclusion consultant, and sexual violence prevention educator based in Minneapolis, MN. He lives with his loving partner and his funtastic dog. He blogs weekly at Change from Within. Learn more about his work at his website here and follow him on Twitter @utt_jamieRead his articles here and book him for speaking engagements here.

Photo: Flickr/durera_toujours

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Comments

  1. Wes Carr says:

    Guilt is just a means of manipulation, nothing more. Whether it comes from parents, teachers, religion or whatever group using it. It is just about getting you to do what they want. Feeling bad about something you screwed up is normal. You try not to repeat it and fix the problem if possible. But don’t let someone else hold it over you as a means of control.

    • OirishM says:

      Indeed – no coincidence that those agitating for change use privilege as a concept to guilt people with.

  2. BlindPelican says:

    How about not feeling guilty at all rather than jumping through a series of hoops put in front of you by others?

    Why should one be put into a place of feeling badly about themselves by comparison to others? By extension, should one feel jealous of someone who is treated better? It seems to me that that sort of thinking is the crux of the idea of privilege in the first place.

    Monitor your own behavior and make sure you’re a good person. Treat others fairly and if you hold any “ism” of your own, rectify those attitudes. If you are treated well by society recognize that this should be the *norm* and it is not something “extra” granted to you at the expense of others. Understand that others lack some of those rights and don’t experience fair treatment. Having rights and being treated fairly is something you’re entitled to. It’s something *everyone* is entitled to.

    If so inclined, be proactive and seek out ways you can right injustice – to both yourself and others – and make sure everyone receives the fair treatment and rights due to them as human beings.

    But if you’re feeling guilty, like Wes said, you’re being manipulated.

  3. I never got this whole white guilt thing. Or this need for men of certain ideologies to prostrate themselves before women so completely. It seems very undignified, and must be pretty difficult to live with sometimes.

  4. Minorities feel guilt (shame?) because they are told by society at large that they have less worth

    Privileged feel guilt because they ARE the society telling the minorities that they have less worth.

    The minority didn’t do anything to feel guilt. Something was done TO them to feel guilt.
    The privileged feel guilt because of something they did, not something that was done to them.

    I believe this is why the privileged have such a hard time understanding privilege. Because even if you know that you personally didn’t do this or that, you are part of the group that made the choice to actively participating in lessening the worth of other people in society.

    I personally think if society valued logic over emotions we wouldn’t have such a problem. I’ve heard a guy in shorts and a t-shirt call a woman a whore because she didn’t have a jacket on and was therefore “not dressed properly for the weather”. If this man had used logic instead of his emotions he would have seen his shorts-wearing hypocricy.
    I’ve seen white people carry on full converstaions with other white people with a different accent, but the minute a mexican or asian person talks to them with an accent, this white person will all of a sudden not be able to understand this person and get mad and tell them to “speak english” (sadly – I work on a military base – so I usually hear this from customers complaining that the associates “can’t even speak english” – These are airmen and soldiers wives who are being told by other military to “speak english”) This is cleary very racist and its pretty sad, though not suprising, that this mostly comes from military personnel.

    If these people were to employ reason and logic they would see that they lack character. that their actions aren’t honorable, they aren’t even reasonable. They are a glorified toddler having an emotional tantrum over having to adjust to someone elses terms that they are not familiar and therefore comfortable with.

    • Guilt is a choice. You can’t impose guilt on another. It has to be accepted.

      I don’t see how being a white, heterosexual male is a privilege. Seriously.

      – We are the least publicly funded demographic.
      – The majority of males in the west start their lives with genital mutilation.
      – Girls are given extra programs and help over boys in school.
      – School’s in general are tailored more towards girl’s learning styles over boys.
      – Boys are told over and over growing up, masculinity is a pathology that needs to be fixed.
      – Enrollment rates in university are almost twice the rate for young women over young men in the west.
      – By the time a man hits 30 he’s making 10% less than the average 30 year old woman.
      – For pretty much every demographic except for white males there’s some form of affirmative action, resulting in needing to perform better than others in order to receive the same rewards.
      – Men pay the majority of the taxes but receive the least of the benefits.
      – Alimony and child support laws are ridiculously skewed in women’s favour.
      – Male suicide rates, work place deaths, and homelessness are 4 – 10 times higher compared to women.
      – Male victims of rape and domestic violence are all but ignored in the west.
      – Men receive much less healthcare spending compared to women (breast cancer vs prostate cancer as an example).
      – Men die on average 5 years earlier than women.

      So… where’s my privilege? Seriously. I’m not being a smart ass.

      • Tom Brechlin says:

        Brand … what you stated plus a couple of others of my own is why I feel no guilt in relationship to society. With all the pit falls I’ve experienced in life, I don’t see myself as privileged either.

        Right off the top, without giving any thought, you can add:
        – Un-diagnosed mental health illnesses
        – Casualties of war
        – Government mandated selective service
        – male suicide rates
        – No male centered medical facilities for breast cancer. (Added because of a recent GMP article on male breast cancer)

    • Because even if you know that you personally didn’t do this or that, you are part of the group that made the choice to actively participating in lessening the worth of other people in society.
      That’s guilty by association. Sharing demographics with someone doesn’t mean that you engage in such activities. This is the same line of logic that gives rise to the idea that all men benefit from rape. How does being a part of that group make you inherently privileged?

    • This is what I’m talking about. There is this narrative that I should feel guilty for being a part of something that I wasn’t a part of. It just seems illogical to feel that way. I imagine that those who struggle with such a feeling have a pretty rough time.

  5. Wes Carr says:

    It seems pretty presumptuous to assume other people automatically need, or even want help. I have
    no problem helping someone if they ask. There are plenty of “White Knights” around who make it their mission in life to come to the rescue of women to make themselves look better.

  6. John Anderson says:

    Once I was approaching a street corner. 2 women were standing waiting to cross. One was blind. I was coming up behind the blind woman when the light changed. The other woman started crossing the street. I mentioned that the light was green and the blind woman started crossing also. When we reached the other side, I told her you’re across. She thanked me. The interesting thing was the other woman started asking her where she was going (a different direction than I) and offered to walk her there. I think she felt guilty that she wasn’t the person to have helped her cross, but most will help those in need and she only needed to be reminded of this need.

    In the old days people who had things or could do things considered themselves fortunate. They helped people who were less fortunate (the needy) and such. Many considered it an obligation like with church food or clothing drives. People would volunteer their time tutoring students who were behind. The big difference with this and privilege was that we didn’t have black people food drives or tutoring for failing female students. The fortunate were expected to help the less fortunate, everyone who was less fortunate. Privilege is just a concept started to allow some groups to feel superior to others and to exclude certain groups from the benefits of assistance.

  7. Phillyosopher says:

    Of course, pointing out another’s privilege is itself the exercise of privilege. Or just a way of avoiding accountability…

  8. If “privilege” was ever a useful concept (and I believe that at one point it was) then it has become so watered down and misused by internet slackivists that it has lost all meaning. “check your privilege” is the new “know your place.” it’s not a call to introspection, it’s a bludgeon. A weapon of the self-righteous. It’s become a way to count coup and earn points in the call out game.

    • Wes Carr says:

      I agree. It is just a slogan like “Mission Accomplished” or “Yes We Can.” It requires no real thought.

      • Tom Brechlin says:

        John, Philly, Wes and 8ball, ya;ll are top of this. I really like “slackavists.” We need to use the term more so that it can be added to Websters.

  9. Mostly_123 says:

    “The privileged feel guilt because of something they did, not something that was done to them… Because even if you know that you personally didn’t do this or that, you are part of the group that made the choice to actively participating in lessening the worth of other people in society… Privileged feel guilt because they ARE the society telling the minorities that they have less worth. The minority didn’t do anything to feel guilt. Something was done TO them to feel guilt.” 

    To me, this statement here encapsulates the entire paradox and (I feel) the very hypocrisy of the argument: Guilt is a very personal, and a very intimate emotion- its relevance is rooted in personal conscience, personal action, (or inaction) and personal culpability & responsibility. And all of this built on a foundation of personal autonomy; not collective, not external.   

    Saying ‘you personally didn’t do this or that, but you are part of the group that did’ conflates the real limitations in personal efficacy -limitations in personal power, ability, persuasion, and authority- with tacit approval (and/or dismisses the notion of moral/personal objection as contradictory or irrelevant- that conscience, intent and counter-collective-action don’t matter; that only efficacy does) 

    Is one then not also a minority (and so, without privilege) when the actions of their (supposedly) ‘own’ society or ‘collectives’ are at odds with their individual values and choices; and they are powerless (or rather, have very finite power & efficacy) to influence that collective?

    Collective guilt (I believe) is a bad idea on principle, because their really is no ‘collective guilt’ at all – That is, even when we’ve all made the same bad decisions, committed the same moral failings straight across the board by everyone, the failings themselves, whatever the scale, are still individual ones- ‘ours’ individually. Collective ‘guilt’ is a measure of the collective magnitude, of the scope & scale; but it is not a measure of the magnitude or boundaries of personal culpability and responsibility- which is exactly where the significance and relevance of the evaluation guilt lays. We may condemn or exonerate a society, a collective, or a demographic collectively; but the more broadly we do so, the more we divorce ourselves from nuance and understanding the subjective & variable boundaries of power-relations, which, in the end, always breaks down most basically to individuals, acting individually (though constituting and reconstituting collectively).              

    Guilt may be by action or omission of action (or conscience), and that covers a lot of ground; but beyond that very broad scope, guilt is never truly (in my opinion) external- otherwise, it cannot be guilt – it implicitly demands some level of control, power, influence, and thus, culpability. Guilt is a concept which inherently demands internalization; That which is utterly and truly externalized beyond our influences, is indeed, not ours. And collective absolutes (which define and determine the boundaries of collective guilt) are not the same as individual ones, let alone individual relativities.                

    The guilt we feel, even if it’s on a collective scale, or across a collective spectrum, is still a very personal judgment of one’s own role, responsibility, and culpability; and it also speaks to the true nature of one’s relationship these supposed collectives. I think part of the problem is that some people look (or may expect others to look at) their relationships with theirs or others’ so-called collectives as objective absolutes: Race, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, etc- these are quantifiable, objective, observable characteristics, yes; but the collectives formed around them -their variable relationships and interrelationships- are not absolute and objective. On the contrary, they are subjective and relative. These collectives and ‘society’ itself are what Thaddeus Blanchette once referred to as ‘a palimpsest of obsolete rules and new initiatives, proposed and enforced by a vast and shifting array of differently situated agents.’ They are not, and never were, fixed constants- but we toss them around like they were.   

    Because of all of this, collective guilt simply becomes a sort exercise in rhetorical and/or psychological ‘double jeopardy’ – a game of ‘you didn’t do it personally, but you’re collectively responsible’ – the worst of all worlds, because it appeals against logic to reproach one’s conscience; to undo that personal failing, because it was a personal failing, which was not done. If what is past cannot be undone, then what has not passed, what one has not profaned, certainly cannot be reconsecrated.

    To possess, invoke, renounce, deny, abrogate, or exploit one’s (relative, situational, subjective) power individually is not the same as wielding power collectively or absolutely, whatever the boundaries of that collective might be defined as. Defying collectives (one’s ‘own’ or others) to little effect or no avail is not the same as tacit approval. And the relative morality or immorality of one’s position is not simply determined by one’s present ability/inability to interject or impose their own will or values on a greater collective- for good or ill.  

  10. Mostly_123 says:

    “‘I’m a racist, classist, sexist, ableist homophobe who is ruining everything everywhere.’ Yeah, it’s a little dramatic, but it’s honestly reflective of how I felt…
    After all, if I am aware of the ways in which I contribute to oppression in my daily life, I can seek the knowledge and understanding I need to act for change in ways that might actually have an impact.”

    Given the very personal nature of guilt, and the subjectivity of these criteria, I would really like know what specific bars/standards/barometers you personally use or used to classify your behavior, thoughts & attitudes as such. What specific real-world examples of yours are you referring to? And, as such, do you mean to infer your own criteria onto others- what boundaries do you use?

    • Wes Carr says:

      I don’t know if Jamie Utt is really feeling guilty, or he is just trying to score points for showing how enlightened he is. To borrow an old saying, he needs to climb down from the cross, because someone else needs the wood.

  11. Mostly_123 says:

    Sorry if this double posted – if so, please omit..

    “The privileged feel guilt because of something they did, not something that was done to them… Because even if you know that you personally didn’t do this or that, you are part of the group that made the choice to actively participating in lessening the worth of other people in society… Privileged feel guilt because they ARE the society telling the minorities that they have less worth. The minority didn’t do anything to feel guilt. Something was done TO them to feel guilt.” 

    To me, this statement here encapsulates the entire paradox and (I feel) the very hypocrisy of the argument: Guilt is a very personal, and a very intimate emotion- its relevance is rooted in personal conscience, personal action, (or inaction) and personal culpability & responsibility. And all of this built on a foundation of personal autonomy; not collective, not external.   

    Saying ‘you personally didn’t do this or that, but you are part of the group that did’ conflates the real limitations in personal efficacy -limitations in personal power, ability, persuasion, and authority- with tacit approval (or just dismisses the notion of moral, personal objection as contradictory or irrelevant- that conscience, intent and counter-collective-action don’t matter; that only efficacy does) 

    Is one then not also a minority (and so, without privilege) when the actions of their (supposedly) ‘own’ society or ‘collectives’ are at odds with their individual values and choices; and they are powerless (or rather, have very finite power & efficacy) to influence that collective?

    Collective guilt (I believe) is a bad idea on principle, because their really is no ‘collective guilt’ at all – That is, even when we’ve all made the same bad decisions, committed the same moral failings straight across the board by everyone, the failings themselves, whatever the scale, are still individual ones- ‘ours’ individually. Collective ‘guilt’ is a measure of the collective magnitude, of the scope and scale; but it is not a measure of the magnitude or boundaries of personal culpability and responsibility- which is exactly where the significance and relevance of the evaluation guilt lays. We may condemn or exonerate a society, a collective, or a demographic collectively; but the more broadly we do so, the more we divorce ourselves from nuance and understanding the subjective & variable boundaries of power-relations, which, in the end, always breaks down most basically to individuals, acting individually (though constituting and reconstituting collectively).              

    Guilt may be by action or omission of action (or conscience), and that covers a lot of ground; but beyond that very broad scope, guilt is never truly (in my opinion) external- otherwise, it cannot be guilt – it implicitly demands some level of control, power, influence, and thus, culpability. Guilt is a concept which inherently demands internalization; That which is utterly and truly externalized beyond our influences, is indeed, not ours. And collective absolutes (which define and determine the boundaries of collective guilt) are not the same as individual ones, let alone individual relativities.                

    The guilt we feel, even if it’s on a collective scale, or across a collective spectrum, is still a very personal judgment of one’s own role, responsibility, and culpability; and it also speaks to the true nature of one’s relationship these supposed collectives. I think part of the problem is that some people look (or may expect others to look at) their relationships with theirs or others’ so-called collectives as objective absolutes: Race, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, etc- these are quantifiable, objective, observable characteristics, yes; but the collectives formed around them -their variable relationships and interrelationships- are not absolute and objective. On the contrary, they are subjective and relative. These collectives and ‘society’ itself are what Thaddeus Blanchette once referred to as ‘a palimpsest of obsolete rules and new initiatives, proposed and enforced by a vast and shifting array of differently situated agents.’ They are not, and never were, fixed constants- but we toss them around like they were.   

    Because of all of this, collective guilt simply becomes a sort exercise in rhetorical or psychological ‘double jeopardy’ – a game of ‘you didn’t do it personally, but you’re collectively responsible’ – the worst of all worlds, because it appeals against logic to reproach one’s conscience; to undo that personal failing, because it was a personal failing, which was not done. If what is past cannot be undone, then what has not passed, what one has not profaned certainly cannot be reconsecrated.

    To possess, invoke, renounce, deny, abrogate, or exploit one’s (relative, situational, subjective) power individually is not the same as wielding power collectively or absolutely, whatever the boundaries of that collective might be defined as. Defying collectives (one’s ‘own’ or others) to little effect or no avail is not the same as tacit approval. And the relative morality or immorality of one’s position is not simply determined by one’s present ability or inability to interject or impose their own will or values on a greater collective- for good or ill.

    • Agree with your assessment of the guilt dynamic.

      Psychologically, guilt is an emotion that should moderate more extreme forms of selfishness by promoting cooperation and even certain forms of altruism. When used politically, as is often the case, against the “rich”, for example, and their opulence and conspicuous consumption habits, it morphs into class warfare – which in my view is the inevitable artifact of this political social meme.

  12. Agree with your assessment of the guilt dynamic.

    Psychologically, guilt is an emotion that should moderate more extreme forms of selfishness by promoting cooperation and even certain forms of altruism. When used politically, as is often the case, against the “rich”, for example, and their opulence and conspicuous consumption habits, it morphs into class warfare – which in my view is the inevitable artifact of this political social meme.

  13. Wes Carr says:

    Anyone remember Pat Tillman? After 9-11 he gave up a career in pro football to become an Army Ranger. When he was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan the Army tried to cover up what really happened and use his death for publicity. His “privilege” didn’t stop a bullet, or keep him from being as expendable as anyone else.

  14. Expecting and driving accountability (from self and others) is the penicillin that kills the victim mentality. If one of my managers told me “My workstream is behind timeline because I am a gay black man” I think I would probably burst out laughing and check the calendar to see if it was April 1st. He’s gotten to his position because he is smart and engaging guy who gets the job done and does really well in front of the client.

  15. Oh goodie, another self flagellating male feminist attempting to convince the masses that it’s our responsibility to embrace collective guilt trips.

    To who ever wrote this delusional manifesto: Please be advised that your inability to stand up for yourself makes you a poor advocate for what ever loopy progressive cause you assume the rest our your gender should rightfully champion. We’re not all Marxist feminist. We work for a living.

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