Pulling Over: One Dad’s Search for Beauty in His Daily Parenting Routine

Pulling Over: One Dad's Search for Beauty in His Daily Parenting Routine

Steve Edwards struggles to appreciate the small moments of grace he encounters every day as an overworked parent

Before I tell you about the snowy owl I saw on Christmas or why I got pulled over by the police twice in the last three days, let me say a little about my life and daily routine. I’m a husband, a father to a four-year-old boy with special needs, and I have (and my wife does, too, for that matter) a full-time job. I teach a 4/4 load as an assistant professor—writing and literature courses, mostly—at a university in central Massachusetts, and the entirety of my paycheck goes to paying for my son’s medicine, doctor’s bills, and specialized pre-school. My wife’s paycheck goes toward the rest of our expenses—rent, heat, food, student loans. We make good money but barely scrape by. Sometimes we try to laugh it off, calling it our “posh special needs lifestyle.”

I get up at six and make coffee. My wife has an hour commute and is out the door about the time our son leaps out of bed and starts asking what’s for breakfast. I make him toast and get together his meds. He has four of them—I think. I’ve done this routine so many times, I do it without thinking at all really. But I think it’s four. Drops go in his milk. Then a plunger-vile of another prescription. Then a teaspoon of another. Then a capsule I break open over applesauce or sorbet.

After breakfast, I turn on the TV for him so I can pack his lunch, pack my lunch, then set out his clothes for the day and iron my own clothes (though admittedly, I have a gray sweater and a pair of brown cords that are in pretty high rotation because they don’t have to be ironed). Once I’ve gotten us ready for the day, my next big task is getting my son to put on his jacket. For some reason, the thought of wearing his jacket sends my son into apocalyptical fits. He will rage and cry and curl up in a ball in the corner. I would just take him outside without his jacket—hell with it—but it’s Massachusetts, and winter, and this morning it was 5 degrees. Some days, after I’ve gotten the jacket on him and gotten him out to the car, I say, “Oops. I forgot something inside. I’ll be right back.” Then I rush inside and let out a string of profanities at the top of my lungs.

After that, I drive an hour to my son’s special preschool (where, thank god, he gets amazing care and support). Then it’s another hour commute to my job. And that’s pretty much the morning—frenetic and mind-numbingly dull at the same time. The rest of the day, I meet with students and try to appear like a normal human to my colleagues who probably wonder why I am wearing that sweater and those cords AGAIN. After work, I race home, clean up the breakfast dishes, and prepare dinner for my wife and son who are both exhausted from their days, and cranky (as am I, most nights). An hour of after-dinner television or music and it’s bedtime for my son. You can imagine how well this goes over: he yells, screams, swats at us, cries his eyes out, and then—once he’s finally in bed—turns so angelic I hate to say goodnight because this is the only good part of the day. “Sing me a song, Daddy,” he says. “Sing me ‘Thunder Road.'”

And of course I do. You have to.

That’s a typical day for us in what has been anything but a typical year. At the end of the summer, I had a kidney stone and had to make a midnight run to the emergency room. Two days later, with no warning at all, our son’s preschool (a different one from where he goes now) said he needed a full-time aide or they wouldn’t allow him back. Spoiler Alert: We didn’t think he needed a full-time developmental aide, and we couldn’t have afforded a full-time developmental aide even if we did. So they effectively booted him from preschool two days after my kidney stone and only a week before my fall semester started. After a mad scramble to find him a new school—because if we didn’t find him a new school, either my wife or I would have had to quit our jobs in order to pay for the services our son did, in fact, need—after all that, my wife got sick with pneumonia.

I wanted my wife to again be the healthy, happy, and wonderful woman I had married five years ago, and I wanted to again be her healthy, happy, and wonderful husband, and not the sleep-deprived, stressed out, anxious, grumpy mess I had become.

She hacked and coughed and was practically bed-ridden for three and a half weeks in the month of October. Then (yes, there’s more) after she had recovered, she slipped while carrying our sleeping boy from the car to the house and badly damaged her left knee. She was on crutches for a month, and, thankfully, only needed a cortisone shot and not full blown reconstructive surgery. But she was in severe pain every day, and it often woke her at night if she shifted in her sleep. And none of these challenges, of course, made it any easier for my wife or I to do our jobs, to work with our special needs child, or manage the bills that kept pouring in like so much floodwater in a basement.

So it doesn’t surprise me that through it all, I forgot to get the sticker for my car that certifies it has been inspected by the state to meet emissions standards. In Massachusetts, it’s something you have to do every year, and, as an environmentalist, I’m glad the state makes at least a cursory effort of protecting our air and water. That’s why I drive a 2010 Prius—to lessen my environmental impact. But what can I say, 2010 Prius or not: I forgot to get the inspection. I didn’t have the sticker.

The first day I got pulled over was a Wednesday morning after a big snowstorm, and preschool had been delayed for two hours. This meant that instead of prepping for the class I had to teach that afternoon, I was watching Barney and Friends with my kid. I drove by the police car, it pulled out behind me, and the lights came on. I wasn’t speeding. What the heck was going on?

The officer took my license and registration back to his cruiser and ran them through his computer, then returned and pointed out my expired state inspection sticker. I was frustrated by the delay in an already delayed day, and annoyed that that was the reason he had pulled me over (Didn’t he have something better to do?), but I thanked the officer for only giving me a warning ticket and was on my way. The encounter took about fifteen minutes, and I made mental plans to get the inspection on Saturday. Which is exactly what I explained to the officer who pulled me over this morning for the exact same reason. Only this time I was driving my son to an early 8 a.m. appointment with his speech therapist and we were on a busy stretch of road.

We were on a busy stretch of road at the busiest time of the morning commute. I passed the police car, thought about Wednesday morning’s episode, and breathed a sigh of relief when it didn’t pull out behind me. But then—off in the distance, in my rearview mirror: flashing blue lights. Surely, I thought, he can’t be rushing after me. He wouldn’t force the eight or ten cars behind me, at the height of the morning commute, to pull over just so he could hassle me for having an expired state inspections sticker on my 2010 Prius on the way to take my special needs child to speech therapy.

Wrong.

“License and registration,” the officer said as the cars on the road whooshed by and my son repeatedly asked why the policeman was talking to us.

I handed the officer my license and registration, and I showed him the warning ticket I’d gotten on Wednesday. I told him that I had made arrangements to get the inspection done on Saturday.

“Just be sure you do that,” he said sternly, handing back my papers. “You’re two months expired. You’re living on borrowed time.”

“I’m going Saturday,” I said again.

“It only takes fifteen-twenty minutes,” he said.

I told him a third time that I would get it done Saturday and thanked him, and, after we had started off down the road and the officer had turned, I banged the steering wheel and in frustration yelled, “FUCK!”

And in back my son said, “FUCK!”

Before we got pulled over this morning, I had been thinking that I would write something about Beauty and the necessity of Beauty for getting through hard times. I had been thinking about our trip on Christmas Day. We drove out to the coast, north of Boston—just the three of us—to gorgeous Plum Island and the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. It was cold but clear. Fourteen degrees. Breezy. Along one of the roads by the water, some cars were stopped, and some people had big-lensed cameras held up to their faces. They had spotted a snowy owl. At my wife’s suggestion, I pulled over and grabbed my binoculars and ran out to catch a glimpse of the bird.

Before getting pulled over this morning, I thought I would reflect on the incredible and almost healing beauty of that owl’s stoic countenance among the rustling beach grasses, the Atlantic gleaming like a dark blue crystal in the distance. I wanted to say: THIS. This matters. Beauty matters.

But after getting pulled over, that sweet thought was gone, replaced by adrenaline and anger and resentment.

I wanted to tell the officer that I didn’t have fifteen minutes to just buzz by and get an inspection, that we all lived on borrowed time. I wanted to tell my son not to say the F-word. I wanted to tell myself not to say the F-word in front of my son. I wanted my wife to again be the healthy, happy, and wonderful woman I had married five years ago, and I wanted to again be her healthy, happy, and wonderful husband, and not the sleep-deprived, stressed out, anxious, grumpy mess I had become. I wanted my son to just be better. To be healed somehow. To not yell and scream and cry all the time. To not be overcome by mysterious waves of gut pain. To not say to his mother in stern tones: “Mommy, you are NOT my friend! YOU ARE NOT!” I wanted us all to feel good for a change. I wanted that, and the only thing I could do was to keep driving and breathe deep and hope that that owl might glide back into my thoughts on silent wings.

♦◊♦

You can read more about Steve Edwards’ evolution as father in “Not Failure But Courage: Parenting a Special Child,” “The Day I Found My Voice: Becoming the Father My Family Needed,” and “Postcards from a Birth Story.”

Credit—Photo: Casey Konstantin/Flickr

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About Steve Edwards

Steve Edwards lives in Massachusetts with his wife and young son. He is the author of the memoir, Breaking into the Backcountry, the story of his time as the caretaker of a backcountry homestead along the Rogue National Wild and Scenic River in Oregon. His writing can be found in Electric Literature, AGNI Online, The Fiddleback, and Terrain.org. You can find Steve online at steveedwardswriter.com and he tweets at @The_Big_Quiet

Comments

  1. Steve,

    Another great essay!

    Just to preempt anyone who may be thinking (or writing) — “Yeah, it’s like that with *all* kids, kitcherwhinin'” Let someone who has parented both children with special needs and children with challenging (but not “special”) needs – it *is* different for Dads like Steve!

    Cheers,

    Gary

  2. Thanks so much, Gary. It can be isolating to have such challenges, and it’s always nice to remember that there is, in fact, community. Appreciate your comment.

  3. Wow! Thanks for the realistic story of dealing with hardship. Because, your son has stomach troubles, You might want to check with a naturopath. Food sensitivities can cause behavioral problems, and MDs miss them. And, Medicines can cause illnesses.

  4. Respect Steve. I get frustrated enough to swear when I’m dealing with my two boys, who aren’t facing the same challenges, and who are really quite well behaved wee boys. I believe firmly that society should be more supportive of parents like you… and yes I know this means the reallocation of resources. But it is hard to find the beauty in life when you’re in a constant state of stress, and plenty of people have significantly fewer issues to deal with on a day to day basis. A problem shared in this respect can be more than halved. In the meantime best wishes finding more examples of beauty.

  5. David–Thanks so much for the note. My goal in sharing a few stories is to serve as a reminder that we (myself included!) don’t always realize/recognize the challenges other people are facing. So what you said means a lot to me. I’m also working–albeit slowly–at seeing these challenges as something beautiful, if only for the love required in navigating them. Best wishes to you!

  6. Steve,

    Great job portraying a day in the life. I have parented a special needs child and 3 other children for years. It never ceases to amaze me when a friend or family member thinks they “get it” and they are no where close to understanding the stress and frustration. I am grateful only one of my children is special needs. Because this single mom thing is hard enough…if I had more than one, well I’m sure I would do just fine on less sleep. You sound like AWESOME parents – keep up the good work.

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