Ballots Behind Bars: The Other 1%

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About Cameron Conaway

Cameron Conaway, Executive Editor at The Good Men Project, is a former MMA fighter and an award-winning poet. He is the author of Caged: Memoirs of a Cage-Fighting Poet, Bonemeal: Poems and Until You Make the Shore. Conaway is on the Editorial Board at Slavery Today. Follow him on Google+ and on Twitter: @CameronConaway.

Comments

  1. Thanks so much for bringing this to our attention, Cameron. I was watching the Houses of Parliament Live when Cameron said he would ignore yet another E.U. directive. You’ve made the case, so I don’t need to add a ribbon to a rose, but wanted to say “thank you” for writing the article. Important stuff, well said. That’s all!

    • Cameron Conaway says:

      jG -

      Thanks for the comment here. I’m glad the article resonated with you. Important stuff, indeed! :)

      ~Cameron

  2. Voting is a privilege, not a right. If the rules of the game are stated up front, I don’t see what the problem is.

    The more important fundamental problem is changing what constitutes a felonious crime and one worth imprisonment. I don’t think drug possession of any sort should land one in prison, but a person who commits murder definitely deserves to be in prison and I have no problem with taking away their voting privileges for the rest of their lives if they should be paroled.

    The same theory of retributive justice is applied to gun ownership by felons. Though we have a 2nd Amendment right to bear arms, felons are usually stripped of this “right” or privilege. It’s probably wise to place this limitation on gun ownership.

    • Cameron Conaway says:

      Chuck,

      Thanks for your feedback here. Your problem seems to be with the prison system in general, the root. If those incarcerated for drug possession were released we would increase the number of eligible voters by hundreds of thousands.

      What do you think should be the punishment for those caught in possession? Murder is murder, but should the crime of passion scenario add shades of gray? I mentioned the woman who snapped…should her voting rights be forever stripped the same as the serial rapist-murderer who rampaged communities for years?

      Also, your thought on privilege vs. right reminded me of this: http://www.fairvote.org/voting-a-right-a-privilege-or-a-responsibility#.UJX-MYUiqmE

      I hope to hear more from you. Thanks, Chuck!

      ~Cameron

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Photo—bobjagendorf/Flickr Article originally published here at The Good Men Project. [...]

  2. [...] to pay about ten times the amount it would cost to keep him locked up for life. As alluded to in Ballots Behind Bars, talk of reforming the system is often misconstrued for weakness and weakness costs votes. And yet [...]

  3. [...] to pay about ten times the amount it would cost to keep him locked up for life. As alluded to in Ballots Behind Bars, talk of reforming the system is often misconstrued for weakness and weakness costs votes. And yet [...]

  4. [...] a marijuana law violation in 2010. Of those, 88% were arrested for possession only. As discussed in Ballots Behind Bars, many jails throughout America have essentially become recidivism factories. The same people are [...]

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