Scratching the Surface

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About Diana Palka

Diana is a writer, runner, lover of words and life-long learner. She graduated with a Bachelor's degree in News-Editorial Journalism from Gardner-Webb University and since entering the proverbial "real world," has been challenged (slash forced) to learn what does and doesn't work when communicating honest messages. Currently, she works with a Benefit Consulting firm just outside New York City where she heads up the creation of employee communications and client deliverables for her team. Diana has a passion for a brave vulnerability that reveals the ugliest of impurities in the light of a perfecting grace.

Comments

  1. John Schtoll says:

    I am sorry but I don’t think I can agree that men can’t have a conversation about being good men without a womans perspective. I think a man can be good without a woman in his life but more importantly , he can have a conversation with other men without the female perspective on what she thinks a good man is.

    It kinda reminds me of an old joke “Women don’t want to hear what you think, they only want to hear what they think but in a lower voice”

  2. Mostly_123 says:

    “The conversation surrounding what it takes to be a ‘good man’ can’t wholly exist without the perspective of a woman. Not just one woman; women. It can be talked about – tossed around in the locker room at the gym – but the potential of the dialogue is gravely stunted when women and their landscapes are excluded.” 

    Maybe,
    maybe not. 
    First and foremost, I think it’s contingent on the the gifts and the insights that each individual brings (or fails to bring) to the conversation. There are lots of situations in life where we do not (and will not, and simply cannot) have the benefit of first-hand knowledge or experience: This does not mean that our perspectives carry no weight. But nor does it mean that they carry all the same veracity or perspective (or on the flip side of that matter- potentially, bias) all the time. Regardless, one ignores (or fails to fully utilize) valuable counsel at their own peril.    

    I’m wondering what the general reaction would be to the reverse of the gender hats:   

    ‘The conversation surrounding what it takes to be a good woman can’t wholly exist without the perspective of a man. Not just one man; men. It can be talked about – tossed around in the locker room at the gym – but the potential of the dialogue is gravely stunted when men and their landscapes are excluded.’

    I tend to think my reaction would be the same guarded statement I made above: In most any situation, there will always limitations to my experience, and hence, my insights; both respective and irrespective of my gender. That doesn’t mean that one can’t, shouldn’t, and won’t contribute. I could always be wrong.   

    In closing, to quote FDR: ”There is no indispensable man.”

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