Canadian Ad Campaign Helps Clarify Consent

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About Kathryn DeHoyos

Kathryn DeHoyos currently resides on the outskirts of Austin, TX. She is the News Editor for the Good Feed Blog and absolutely loves what she does. She is the happy mommy to a wild 2 year old girl-child, and is blissfully happy being un-married to her life partner DJ.

Comments

  1. The steps away from the Hetronormative and the fact that the Big Triggering R word is not used are improvements.

    But sorry – The CDC showed last year that there is a massive unrecognised issue with sexual assault by women against men and other women. So where are the posters addressing that issue?

    Making it all gender oriented around don’t be that guy is just the Only Men Can Stop Rape trope by a different add company – and it’s bad marketing of the anti rape product!

    • Why must every anti-rape campaign address all aspects of the problem? Why must is address every possible scenario?

      This particular campaign target guys who think it’s a free-for-all if the chick is drunk out of her skull. These guys exist, and so it’s a problem that needs addressing.That doesn’t mean this is the only rape related problem or that those guys are the only rapists.

      There’s also don’t-drink-and-drive campaigns that target young people specifically. Not because they are the only people who do it, but because that’s *one* problem we need to do something about.

      Targeting one particular issue, with one particular group, makes for effective communication. Trying to have every campaign target everyone, all the time, makes it extremely hard to do good marketing.

      • The second ad kind of negates the idea that it is only aimed at men ring drunk women.

        As well, what wrong with having SOME awareness that women can rape too? When Jenny McCarthy can grope Justin Bieber on live TV, it’s not unreasonable to raise some awareness.

      • I found it upsetting mostly because of the meta-presentation surrounding it. When I originally saw those ads posted to Buzzfeed the title was “Finally, Date Rape Ads That Put The Blame Firmly On The Perpetrators”. When I clicked through, I found a series of pictures that showed men raping people and then cautioned us men not to be “That Guy”. In my mind that title and that tagline firmly gendered the crime.

        I see this gendering as a problem, not just because it’s toxic to the male psyche, but because it obfuscates any thinking about other kinds of sexual assault. Indeed, I view this campaign as indicative of where sexual assault prevention (at least in the US) is right now: so focused on male-on-female rape that other kinds of assault aren’t acknowledged. (To be fair, this campaign stepped out of the box by including gay men. Props.) Indeed, when men bring up the fact that rape isn’t a strictly gendered crime, they are often accused of “hogging attention”, or told they should be happy that some rape is being addressed at all and we’ll get to your problems later.

        And honestly, I can’t tell which response seems more demeaning. On the one hand you are told that you’re a bad person for trying to shed some light on male victims (because that somehow detracts from female victims?). On the other you are told that the kind of rape you experienced just doesn’t matter enough to confront right now. You know what, it’s probably the second one. These dudes made eight (8) posters and your telling me they can’t spare a single one for ANY kind of female-on-anyone-at-all date rape?

        Fundamentally, I don’t think anyone’s asking for endless iterations that cover every possible scenario. But like, there’s only four possible pairings of XX and XY persons. Why exclude 50% of them? It would’ve been so easy to substitute one guy in as a victim and one girl in as a perp.

    • First of all, the campaign is “Men Can Stop Rape,” not “ONLY Men Can Stop Rape.” Implying that there are situations in which men can stop rape–by NOT RAPING. The makers of the campaign are aware that they are only talking about one particular form of sexual assault (by men against whomever)–but even preventing JUST ONE FORM of sexual assault is better than not preventing any sexual assault at all. There is still a toxic meme in our society of Real Men Take Sex Whenever The Opportunity Presents Itself–and drunk women, or women who have said “yes” to you in the past, are viewed as an “opportunity,” not as real people with real needs and insecurities and rights. Both MCSR and the above campaign are focused on destroying that particular meme so that that particular form of sexual assault is rightly considered by the general public to be as horrible as it really is.

      Here’s the thing. Society at large isn’t yet willing to admit that women also commit sexual assault, for a lot of Very Horrible Reasons. Thus, it is not yet time to have MAJOR campaigns devoted to preventing those particular forms of sexual assault, because those campaigns will be mercilessly mocked, women will stubbornly refuse to identify themselves with the Woman Rapist because “women don’t do that, are you crazy?” and the problem won’t get any better. The way to solve the particular problem of women assaulting other people, at this point, is to make it clear that it is even happening at all, because most people haven’t even come that far. There was a point in my own life where I honestly did not believe that it was possible for a woman to rape somebody, because “Women Are Weak,” etc. As the Strong Woman archetype slowly percolates into our national consciousness as Another Valid Way Of Being Female, it will finally become possible to address rape-by-women on a large scale instead of on a case-by-case basis.

      The idea of the abusive husband sort of evolved in a similar fashion. There was a point at which wives were property, and husbands were considered perfectly within their rights to beat or have sex with them at any time of the husband’s choosing. The idea that a man’s strength can sometimes be misused, that overpowering a woman in this way can be wrong, is something that has taken thousands of years to even exist as a concept. We’ve come a long way, but we still have a long way to go.

    • But sorry – The CDC showed last year that there is a massive unrecognised issue with sexual assault by women against men and other women. So where are the posters addressing that issue?

      I agree with this and the rest of your post MediaH. if I remember correctly, a couple of years ago people posted a study that said for uni age students, the percentage of men raped by women was similar to the percentage of women raped by men

      Who could forget this notorious case of men being raped by a woman. And commentary filled with laughter, skepticism – how the rapist was called a ‘nymphomaniac’ (she has actually died 3days ago according to news report of a drink n drugs overdose).
      http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/man-found-sobbing-in-street-after-813563

      I find it rather odious that another poster suggested that now is not the time for a major campaign highlighting that women can rape women, that women can rape men – if not now, then when.

      • I find it rather odious that another poster suggested that now is not the time for a major campaign highlighting that women can rape women, that women can rape men – if not now, then when.

        I didn’t find it so much Odious as Grossly Unimaginative as well as indicative of how money is not targeted to the issues.

        I can think of at least 5 ways of producing and creating imaginative and engaging advertising campaigns which would get the messages out and engage the audience … one would even use a classic cut out man. Don’t Be That Guy is a bad slogan but it reads differently when you have a guy being raped – even if he is a cardboard cut out. Hell it even works with female on female rape (You just change the cut out and add the skirt and put a very big PINK QUESTION MARK AT THE END) … and it even makes you wonder who you know that is the person either perping or being victimised.

        Some advertising and media groups are known for a lack of imagination and lack of ability to work Imaginatively, creatively and provocatively on low budget. Worse – you get supposed high end agencies that get descent and even high end budgets and produce work and concepts that high school students can do better on.

      • on reflection, i should have said ‘rather strange’ and not ‘rather odious’(which is alot harsher than i intended). apologies

  2. Hooray, more gendered ads which fail to show a female perpetrator! Because that really stops a lot of rape.

    As for the question, if she is all over you then not saying no may mean yes but if she’s passed out then she can’t consent either way.

    Question: Where the fuck is the Women can stop rape campaign when about 1 in 5 rapes are female perpetrator, male victim?!

  3. Why must every anti-rape campaign address all aspects of the problem? Why must is address every possible scenario?

    Lars – I do find it comical. I actually pointed to the campaign actually breaking some new ground in that it goes outside of the Hetro normative … and yet you drag it all the way back to the men rape women centrist position! This particular campaign target guys who think it’s a free-for-all if the chick is drunk out of her skull.

    Did you just glance past the second poster and miss the Two Guys and the slogan “It’s not consent when HE changes his mind”?

    Must be bad advertising cos it’s not working on you and getting the message across!

    Maybe you need to rethink you views of advertising campaigns and how to communicate messages, because even when it’s in front of you there is a clear lack of vision and missing the message!

    • Exactly. Why is having a female rapist diluting the message when having a gay rapist is not?

      • It has nothing to do with diluting the message – only making sure it is served hot stewed and made form the same old tea bag and coffee grounds….. again. The message is “Only Men Do It”!

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