The Truth About Dishonesty

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Psychology professor Dan Ariely believes we can be honest and dishonest (at the same time).

“It’s all about rationalization,” Dan Ariely says in the video below. His argument is that the more we rationalize, the more we can benefit from dishonesty while looking in the mirror and viewing ourselves as “good.” Therefore, the less we rationalize, the more honest we’ll become. It makes sense at the surface, but Professor Ariely breaks it all down through his studies of cognitive and behavioral psychology. A quote to remember:

“The magnitude of dishonesty we see in society is by good people who think they’re doing good but in fact are cheating just a little bit, but because there are so many of them, of us, this actually has a tremendous economic impact.”

Check it out:

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About Cameron Conaway

Cameron Conaway is a former MMA fighter, an award-winning poet and the 2014 Emerging Writer-in-Residence at Penn State Altoona. He is the author of Caged: Memoirs of a Cage-Fighting Poet, Bonemeal: Poems, Until You Make the Shore and Malaria, Poems. Conaway is also on the Editorial Board at Slavery Today. Follow him on Google+ and on Twitter: @CameronConaway.

Comments

  1. I wish I had a better understanding on how this isn’t plain old regular dishonesty?

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  1. […] Psychology professor Dan Ariely believes we can be honest and dishonest (at the same time).  […]

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