The Best and Worst Gender Representations in Super Bowl Commercials

Sarah Hope shares what she argues were the very best, and very worst of this year’s Super Bowl ads.

Football. Millions of people tune in to the all-American sport’s most anticipated event each year. Last year, 111.3 million viewers tuned in. This year, according to Nielson data, 71% of TVs that were on during the game were tuned in to the game. That’s a lot of eyeballs, but not all that surprising when there are folks calling for Super Bowl Monday to be a national holiday. The Super Bowl is an American tradition. But there’s an even more interesting statistic here from the Washington Post,

The game also illustrated the explosive growth of second screen activity. The company Trendrr TV, which tracks activity on Twitter, Facebook and other social networks, estimated there were 47.7 million social media posts during the game. That compares to 17 million during the 2012 Super Bowl and 3 million the year before that.

Forty-seven million posts, almost three times the 2012 rate! Super Bowl viewers are certainly ramping up their use of social media to engage with one another in real time.

Twenty-four million of those posts were on Twitter. According to a 2012 Pew study of who uses social media, only 16% of internet users use Twitter, but this figure is growing, doubling since a similar study by eMarketer in 2011. This growing trend in social media use, especially as it relates to the Super Bowl, could be in part due to commercial advertisers’ embrace of the hashtag as a way to encourage second screen viewing among consumers. Twitter was mentioned in 26 of 52 commercials – exactly 50% of commercials aired during CBS’ coverage of the game. Facebook was only mentioned in two ads.

According to Mashable, about 30% of the 24.1 million tweets about the Super Bowl were about the ads. Among the trending hashtags was Miss Representation’s #NotBuyingIt, which was used by opponents of sexism and gender discrimination to call out advertisers who use objectionable gender exploitation to sell their products.

MissRepresentation.org, a “non-profit social action campaign and media organization” grown from the award-winning documentary expose, was “established to shift peopleís consciousness, inspire individual and community action, and ultimately transform culture so everyone, regardless of gender, age or circumstance can fulfill their potential.” Check out their recap of the #NotBuyingIt campaign and all of the good work they’re doing here.

As someone who has never liked football (okay, I’ve never really tried), I spent my evening glued to Twitter, chatting about the much-anticipated commercial madness that polluted the airwaves. I certainly had favorites, least favorites, and commercials that had me on the fence. I laughed, I cried, but most of all I thoroughly enjoyed the lively conversation with like-minded gender activists. Here’s my recap of the best and the worst.

♦◊♦

The Best

There were a number of great depictions of fatherhood this year. During a cultural event watched by a great deal of men (although it’s not an overwhelming majority – many, many ladies watch too), it is ever important feature positive and inclusive depictions of masculinity and fatherhood.

Hyundai takes the cake for the best depictions of family, especially fatherhood. Their early commercial showed a dad making memories with his kids at a scary movie, taking a dangerous ski trail, and eating copious amounts of junk food – questionable situations that prompted him to warn the kids, “don’t tell Mom.” Maybe this plays off the stereotype that Dads never really grow up, and are the “irresponsible” ones in a heterosexual two-parent household, but it is played in a fun, light-hearted way the wipes out any criticism I could muster. Furthermore, at the end, the gender stereotype is deliberately broken as the older son lands from a sky dive; when the adult’s helmet comes off, it’s Mom. “Don’t tell Dad,” she says. The slogan: “The best stories you’ll ever tell start with ‘don’t tell'”.

Hyundai’s second commercial does the same. Dad is in the driver’s seat (literally) of the family’s “Epic Playdate”. Regardless of any possible objections, these commercials show an involved Dad having fun and making memories with his children. No better depiction of dads than that.

Toyota had another great family commercial, with each member of the family being granted a wish by the Rav4 genie, played by Kaley Cuoco from Big Bang Theory. The best part? The young daughter, predictably, wishes to be a princess. We then see her astride a horse about to go into battle to avenge her father’s death. Talk about a positive take on little girls’ princess fantasies!

Another great one for Dads? The “got milk?” commercial featuring The Rock. Although it does play of The Rock’s stereotypical “kick ass” masculinity, and it would have been nice to see some alternative representations of masculinity (just like it would have been nice to see some non-heterosexual families), the bottom line is that this man puts his kids and their need for milk ahead of any opportunity to demonstrate his manliness – including stopping bank robbers and taking down a lion. Then, he’s off to save the world.

Everyone loves the Budweiser Clydesdales. Every year, they bring us a smile in a way that doesn’t eat at our hearts with sexual exploitation or gender stereotyping of any kind. However, this year Budweiser delivered even more than in past years. It is nothing less than a beautiful representation of sensitive masculinity. The commercial’s title, “Brotherhood” also ties it to a positive portrayal of man-to-man friendship and bonding. There’s not much more to say. Just let the tears fall.

Two of my favorite ads portrayed equality in traditionally masculine industries and professions.

Jeep’s ad about making America “whole again” showed both female and male veterans returning home. There were black families, brown families, white families. There were mothers and fathers caring for children in their spouse’s absence. The only thing missing was an LGBT family, but with the recent repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, I can hope with some confidence that that’s not too far away either.

Chrysler’s ad for the Dodge Ram featuring Paul Harvey’s 1978 speech “So God Made a Farmer” was equally as captivating. There were positive depictions of men, women, children of both genders, family, and hard work. With all the hardships faced by farmers in our factory-farm-dominated food industry, an ad supporting the family farm is welcome.

Though I support the gender equity presented in the commercial, it has elicited criticism from Melissa Harris-Perry and Colorlines for the lack of racial equality, and I agree. Also, Paul Harvey was a well-known conservative anti-communist and friend of former Sen. Joseph McCarthy, so perhaps he is not the most respectable spokesperson. Harvey is certainly not as laudable as Oprah, who eloquently and emotively narrated the Jeep commercial. Still, Harvey’s speech is powerful and the ad is compelling for its inclusion of women and positive portrayal of hard-working farmers.

Though these ads were two of my favorites, I was a bit uncomfortable with their lack of inclusive spirituality. Not everyone believes that “God made” farmers, and not every soldier comes home to a church. But in the gender sphere, these two ads were noticeably progressive, and I can only hope that it’s a sign of the times and we can continue to move in a progressive direction as a culture.

♦◊♦

The Worst

The only company deserving of the top spot on “The Worst” list is, of course, GoDaddy. Its “beauty meets the brains” commercial played off of offensive stereotypes of both men and women. See for yourself:

So, clearly, the woman’s only value is in her sexuality. This is par for the course for GoDaddy, a company that seems to acknowledge and then disregard its own repulsive level of misogyny, and has used offensive portrayals of “sexy women” for years to sell its services during the Super Bowl.Equally offensive is the portrayal of Walter, the stereotypical “nerdy web developer” who cannot be torn away from his computer until it’s time to kiss a pretty girl. It is an offensive portrayal of smart men, not to mention blatant fat shaming.

Sadder still has been the response, with folks wondering how many takes it took to get the perfect shot, cries of disgust that such a beautiful woman “had to” kiss such an unpleasant man, and metaphorical back slaps for Walter, who got to live every guy’s dream and kiss Bar Refaeli. We are supposed to simultaneously feel sympathy, revulsion and envy toward Walter. Does GoDaddy want its users to be bullies? Maybe almost as much as GoDaddy wants them to embrace misogyny.

In GoDaddy’s second ad, women are nothing but naggy wives or servants, and despite the multicultural cast, the white guy wins!

The saddest thing of all? GoDaddy isn’t exactly going out of business. If you have GoDaddy, do yourself and all the ladies and gents you know a favor, and switch to a different domain.

AXE body spray, notorious for its narrow portrayals of masculinity, delivered this year with a damsel in distress trope and yet another demonstration of the classic “you’re not man enough unless you use AXE.”

Dear Calvin Klein: for the what feels like the hundredth time, sexually objectifying men is not okay either. Your models present unrealistic expectations for masculinity and sexuality.

Following the CK commercial, Joanna Schroeder here at GMP asked me, “what would we think if it were an ugly girl, handsome dude?” With one of my favorite tweets of the night, this twitter user hit it spot on:

[blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/laurendubinsky/status/298222283368062977"]

Kia’s “Hotbots” commercial was just plain bad. In addition to the return of that nerd stigma, we have a promotion of violence against men that is unfair to both women and men. In fact, it seems to me to be a statement on feminism itself. Though my original impression was that maybe we could interpret those robotic women as tech-savvy women with power over the situation, the violence flips this powerful woman into the “Feminazi” category. Violence against anyone (man OR woman) is not the answer, Kia.

Mercedes had Willem Dafoe. Who doesn’t love Willem Dafoe? Especially when he’s playing Lucifer. Those nails! But what’s the real deal being made here?

The deal: let Willem Dafoe endow you with a Mercedes, he will also endow you with Kate Upton. Or, if you’re man enough, you could buy it (her) yourself

♦◊♦

Rape Culture

Two ads – not one, but TWO – had an air of promoting rape culture about them.

First, Audi’s “Prom” commercial.

The message? When your masculinity is threatened because you don’t have a date (since your masculinity is defined by your ability to “get the girl”), an Audi will give you the confidence to walk up to a girl and kiss her without asking. Who cares if she wants to kiss you! This is about your masculinity, and you need to prove it.
Second, Gildan.

No matter what the situation, or how much you love that shirt, it is unacceptable to undress someone while they’re sleeping. Given the recent Steubenville, OH case of the rape of a teenage girl while she was passed out, this ad stands out as a stark display of disregard for consent. I had never heard of Gildan before last night, but I can’t imagine I’ll be buying their shirts anytime soon.

♦◊♦

Finally, there was one commercial that had me on the fence all night.

Initially, my reaction was that this was an offensive use of the gender bias that keeps fathers from playing with their children. Their masculinity is threatened if they dress up and have tea parties. The only way the dad will choose his daughter over “the guys” is if she bribes him with Doritos. This Twitter user agreed:

[blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/JosephDiD/status/298242044630011906"]

Also, drag comedy is a tricky thing. It can be comical and remain unoffensive if done well, but it can also diminish the struggles of those who face discrimination when they dress according to their true identity.

[blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/KaeLynRich/status/298224425713688576"]

However, later in the night I was still thinking about this commercial. Despite my objections, it does show a dad willing to dress up and play with his daughter. The daughter does bribe him, but maybe that’s just a mediator to father-daughter bonding. I guess you have to start somewhere. Dad and his friends seemed to be having fun – was that all because of the Doritos, or were they really having a grand ol’ time dressing up? It’s hard to say.

♦◊♦

I know, I’m leaving out several commercials here. Budweiser’s non-Clydesdale ads featured parties full of scantily clad women. Volkswagen has been accused of racism in both of its ads, even though the “Get in. Get happy.” ad was not only “approved” by Jamaicans – apparently, they loved it. The infamous Carl’s Jr.’s commercial didn’t air here in the Salt City, but they may take the award for most blatant objectification.

But enough of my opinions.

What did you think?

NOW TRENDING ON GMP TV

Super Villain or Not, Parenting Paranoia Ensues
The Garbage Man Explains Happiness
How To Not Suck At Dating

Premium Membership, The Good Men Project

About Sarah Hope

Sarah Hope is a pop culture enthusiast and gender activist whose interests include social movements, sexuality and feminist theory. She currently works in development and special events at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University and spends her free time blogging and hiking in beautiful Central New York. You can see more of her work at sopopculture.com and follow her on Twitter @sarahmusing.

Comments


  1. In fact, it seems to me to be a statement on feminism itself. Though my original impression was that maybe we could interpret those robotic women as tech-savvy women with power over the situation, the violence flips this powerful woman into the “Feminazi” category. Violence against anyone (man OR woman) is not the answer, Kia.

    Hold up.

    I’ll be the first to agree that the portrayal of violence is wrong but I’m not sure how this was any sort of statement on feminism or how those robots where some metaphor for feminazis.

    Are you saying that the robotic portrayal was fine until they got violent and once they got violent then once they got violence it became a statement about feminism?

    • Ah, let me clarify. I’m saying that initially I thought there might be some way to interpret female robots in a woman positive way. Women are not often portrayed as tech savvy (read: GoDaddy “beauty vs. the brains”), so to have women as the gatekeepers “in charge” of showing and protecting the Kia could have been a feminist statement… if it had been left at that. But then, if you follow that logic through the rest of the commercial, the “strong woman” turns into a violent woman. Feminists are often portrayed as gruff, buzz-killing, and man-hating – so again, following the logic that the women were portrayed as “strong”, this woman’s strength was used against men, which is not a favorable portrayal of strong, powerful women. So, in the end, I turned to the same conclusion that most people reached: that the commercial portrays women as robotic objects, and that’s unacceptable enough in itself.

      • Thanks for the clarity. For a moment it seemed like you were trying to say that the decision to have the robots get violent was meant to be a nod to feminism.

  2. I agreed with most of the reviews above, and as someone who works in the industry, I think you can tell which ads worked harder and smarter, and which ones felt lazy and clearly gave in to the mean-regressing powers of the corporate approval process.

    The spots that told a specific story and were clear about how they wanted the viewer to feel and react did great work. It’s not to say you can’t play with convention and expectation. The Rav4’s Princess turn was brilliant specifically because it had built us up to expect what would happen, and then it surprised. I think it was also interesting to note that the best ads of the night had the confidence to tell a clear, well-crafted story and get us involved before hitting us too hard with the overt brand message or call to action.

    With so much media available to everyone, everyday, the hope for the industry is that we all have to work harder, be more thoughtful, and deliver an experience that’s as entertaining and engaging as “content” or else be left behind.

    As for your back and forth with Joanna via Twitter… I actually saw the GoDaddy.com kiss spot a few days before the SB and wrote something about your “gender reversal” question that just went up today.

    Self-serving link: http://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/the-good-life-handsome-men-with-unattractive-women-a-combination-the-media-will-never-show-you/

    The sad thing is, this year’s GoDaddy spots actually represent “progress” for them, since we weren’t promised any uncut shower scenes or body painting.

    • Joanna Schroeder says:

      Shawn, thanks so much for that link, we definitely want you to share it!

      Great piece. And great work here, Sarah. You both totally rock and I’m so glad you’re both on board.

  3. I would choke down a Budweiser for that Clydesdale trainer. Seriously. The perfect man. And those dimples!

    *Passing out – again*

    :)

  4. LOL@focusing on the misogyny of the ad and ignoring the misandry in the Bar Rafaelli ad. The misandry of the man not being seen as sexy along with the nerd stereotype which nearly always is against men, so probably relates to misandry, along with the issue of sexual power where he has zilch compared to her whom has a huge amount. They’re portraying her as the epitomy of sexy and him as the epitomy of brains, misandry and misogyny all in one.

    “Though my original impression was that maybe we could interpret those robotic women as tech-savvy women with power over the situation, the violence flips this powerful woman into the “Feminazi” category.”
    Starting to really reach now, where the hell is feminism implied in the ad? Do you see swastika? Clearly the ad is about fembots protecting the car from being damaged by a nitwit tyre kicker.

    Mercedes, buy a car, be stalked by women. Fuck that. Gimme an ad that just shows the performance, luxury, features. Quit the silly bullshit about getting the girl with the car, if my car gets me a woman, I DON’T WANT HER. I want a girl to like me for me.

    Sarah, say it with me, MISANDRY, hatred n bigotry towards males. You dropped misogyny quite a bit but there are displays of misandry too, why didn’t you use that word? Please tell me you aren’t schooled in the style of feminism that is utterly blind to misandry and doesn’t believe it exists?

    There are plenty of things wrong with the ads but I can’t help but feel you are seeing what you want to see in them, like the KIA ad has enough wrong with it portraying the women’s sex appeal in a robot but the feminism vibe is simply not there.

    • Archy, I am schooled in a feminism that recognizes everyone’s right to gender equity, and I have studied masculinity quite a bit. I definitely agree with you that most people aren’t willing to use the word “misandry” as easily as “misogyny” rolls off the tongue…but there’s a reason for that. Historically, women have been objectified in media much more than men. Objectification involves reducing a person to the status of an object, to be owned or used. Generally, someone is considered objectified if the status they are reduced to masks other characteristics of their humanity, thereby demeaning them. In the GoDaddy ad, Bar Refaeli is reduced to nothing but her beauty and sexuality, characteristics that are superficial. This is demeaning because this singular quality is elevated above her other qualities and thus above her as a whole person. Who knows, maybe she can code websites as well as Walter! But GoDaddy would never recognize that, because in their world women are nothing but sex objects.

      The difference between that and how Walter is portrayed is this: true, Walter is reduced to a singular quality, “the nerd.” But with that representation comes positive connotations and qualities that are valued in our culture – hard work, intelligence, discipline. This hardly represents hate and bigotry. The real hate and bigotry here is the fat shaming, a bigotry that does not discriminate based on gender.

      Re: Kia – please read my clarification to Danny’s similar question above. Because people are so quick to call out the objectification in that ad, I tried to look a little deeper and initially thought that maybe there was a way to interpret it as a feminist statement – strong, powerful women, etc. In the end, that line of logic would have been flipped on its head by turning those strong, feminist women into misandrist, violent Feminazis. So no, I don’t think there is actual feminism implied there. I was simply explaining my thought process in interpreting the ad; I reached the same conclusion you did!

      In this article, I only the word used “misogyny” twice. I am in fact generally hesitant to use “misogyny” and “misandry” because of the hatred implied. I’m not convinced that the objectification behind these ads comes from a place of pure hatred, but rather from a misunderstanding of the ways in which objectification hurts women and men by perpetuating stereotypes and standards of beauty and manliness that make it difficult for individuals to express their own unique brand of femininity and/or masculinity. That’s the whole point in calling out the gender stereotypes in these ads – to hopefully help people understand that objectification and gender stereotyping diminish our collective well-being and ability to be our true selves. Everyone has the right to be herself/himself without facing hurtful discrimination at the hands of those who buy into the stereotypes and hold us to standards that don’t reflect our unique identities.

      • “Generally, someone is considered objectified if the status they are reduced to masks other characteristics of their humanity, thereby demeaning them.”
        You mean like being reduced to a nerd? You’re doign an awful lot of explaining away the significance of his character whilst focusing on how bad the woman got it, why? Is it that hard to see how objectified he is for being valued only for his mental ability? Maybe as a woman this comes as a surprise but many men do not feel attractive, it’s very dehumanizing to feel like all you’re worth is tied up in what you can make with your hands n brain, We’d love to feel sexy once n a while just as I’m sure women feel limited in their worth being only their looks. It’s 2 sides to a coin that we each want to be both but you’re ignoring the male side and acting as if he isn’t objectified. There’s also a very bad difference here, her worth only being her beauty is bad but as a supermodel she’s also the TOP echelon of her gender, HE is portrayed as a nerd who’d never ever get the chance with someone at the top because HE IS AT THE BOTTOM ECHELON of attractiveness. In popular media his only chance with her would be to become very rich. She is leaps n bounds above him in overall status.

        “But GoDaddy would never recognize that, because in their world women are nothing but sex objects.”
        “Which is limiting yes, but this nerd is also extremely limiting as his value is his ability to code because they portray him only as brains with zero sexual attraction. Like it or not being seen as sexy is also a good trait along with a bad one. For many men being sexy is pretty much impossible, so many people don’t portray men as sexy, their attractiveness is SOLELY based on their success which requires being basically rich or smart. Change that nerd into a McDonalds uniform and he’d be portrayed far differently. There is a huge amount of stigma n bigotry towards nerds.

        “The difference between that and how Walter is portrayed is this: true, Walter is reduced to a singular quality, “the nerd.” But with that representation comes positive connotations and qualities that are valued in our culture – hard work, intelligence, discipline. This hardly represents hate and bigotry. The real hate and bigotry here is the fat shaming, a bigotry that does not discriminate based on gender.”

        Are you serious or pulling my leg? Nerds are one of the most bullied groups in existance, so many have hated nerds. I experienced bullying for daring to answer questions in math class too often. Beauty is one of the most valued traits EVER, beauty is proven to increase a person’s success and holds an epic amount of power in getting the top echelon of partners, more money in their career and generally liked more.

        “I tried to look a little deeper and initially thought that maybe there was a way to interpret it as a feminist statement”
        I will guarantee it wasn’t. I would bet half the world that it was simply meant to be women are normally nearby as the presenters/folks to ask about the car at car shows, but now they’re robots who’ll kick your ass if you damage the car. I severely doubt feminism was even on the creators mind.

        “That’s the whole point in calling out the gender stereotypes in these ads – to hopefully help people understand that objectification and gender stereotyping diminish our collective well-being and ability to be our true selves”
        I get the feeling you are noticing the negatives women face far more than the negatives men face. Doesn’t feminism teach how damaging the success role is? Or the effects of not being seen as sexy can do to men? One of the most common comments about attractiveness on this site alone from men is that of most women can be seen as physically sexy, but pretty much most men are not physically sexy. There are a lot of men that do not feel physically attractive and it has a huge impact on their self-esteem, they focus on their success-attraction (as in being a provider, being smart, etc). Comparing the supermodel with the nerd for instance is both limiting to her but also limiting to him, he’s there as an object of being a smart ugly kid getting a chance that he’ll never get with someone who is seen as pretty much the top echelon of female beauty, it’s extremely degrading to him.

        The success objectification leaves men that don’t make much money, who aren’t smart, who aren’t successfully feeling extremely ugly, just as the physical beauty objectification women face leaves women that aren’t conventionally attractive feeling extremely ugly. It shows in the car ads where having the status symbol of success (a nice car) gets him attention from women he wouldn’t normally have.

        Women want to be seen more for their success traits (brains, career, etc), men want to be seen more for their beauty traits (sexyness), thing is women have been saying how limiting the beauty aspect alone is but not too many men speak up about how limiting they feel with the success aspect. But it’s pretty evident how hard men strive for success with their love of pretty cars, wanting to earn lots of money, etc just as it’s evident for women that spend so much time n energy on their beauty. We’re now seeing a merge-over of those 2 issues, men spending far more time in the gym to look pretty and women spending far more time n energy on their careers, etc. I just can’t help but feel so many see the beauty limitation as negative for women but overlook the limitation of success for men because they see it as positive traits, sure, they are positive traits but so is being beautiful. The problem is that they’re pretty much always seen as that and not much more.

  5. Mark Sherman says:

    I just want to comment on the GoDaddy ad, which seems to be getting huge amounts of attention and angering many feminists. When I watch this ad I don’t see Bar Rafaeli as unintelligent. In my experience beauty and intelligence go together. Of course the character she plays may or may not be so brilliant, but there is not question she is beautiful.

    There is also no question that men love the attentions of beautiful women (though in my experience they quickly lose interest if the woman is not bright and interesting).

    As for Bar Rafaeli, I’d never heard of her before this ad, but I see that she is, among other things, a model and has been modeling since she was quite young. She appeared in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, and was Israeli “Model of the Year.” Clearly, bright as I am sure she is, she has capitalized on her physical beauty. One might say she doesn’t mind being objectified.
    She is also a businesswoman, whose company is called Under.me, and sells designer underwear.

    As for Walter the Nerd, I’m not young enough at this point, but were I anywhere near his age, I would be very envious. Fat shaming? This guy is doing just fine. If anything it might be “rosacea shaming” (what is that red all over his face?). But the implication that the way to the heart of a beautiful woman might be doing well in your work is a message that perhaps more of our nation’s young men should be hearing. They are not doing well. If you suggest that perhaps by doing well they might attract beautiful and intelligent women, they might work harder.

    I know I’m probably not being PC, but I care much more about how boys and young men are doing than all this other stuff. Check out a recent featured article in the New York Times on how they are not doing well. It’s titled “The Boys at the Back.”((http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/02/the-boys-at-the-back/). THAT is really a problem, a big one. And one day it may get the attention it deserves. Boys need studious role models; and maybe Walter the Nerd might not be such a bad one (although from a health point of view, he probably could lose a little weight; and take care of that rosacea or whatever it is).

    • Pale skin + high bloodflow around the cheeks I guess, its always made me surprised too to see just how red his cheeks are. He might be overly anxious too to trigger the Rosacea?

    • You’re right, Bar’s character may be intelligent. But she could also be a drooling idiot. More important, to me, is the intent. Why is she there? She is there to represent the “sexy” side of GoDaddy. It’s blatantly stated. She’s ONLY there to elicit sexual interest.

  6. “The saddest thing of all? GoDaddy isn’t exactly going out of business. If you have GoDaddy, do yourself and all the ladies and gents you know a favor, and switch to a different domain.”
    Thank you SO much for this line! Consumer advocacy is the best way to change companies’ policies and public opinion.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] do you feel about media portrayals of dads playing with their princess-obsessed kid? (Check out The Best and Worst Gender Representations in Super Bowl Commercials for examples.) How do you genuinely connect through your children’s fantasies about being a [...]

Speak Your Mind

*