Study of the Day: Facebook Can Kill Your Marriage

Facebook can ruin your life in a number of different ways; now it’s coming after your marriage.

According to a survey from the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, Facebook is involved in one in five divorces. Eighty percent of matrimonial lawyers have reported a rise in the number instances where social media was used as evidence of cheating.

Sixty-six percent of the lawyers said that Facebook was used as the primary source of evidence in a divorce case, while four percent mentioned Twitter, and 14 percent cited other social media sites. Another 15 percent said that MySpace was used as primary evidence, which raises the question: who the hell still uses MySpace?

Marlene Eskind Moses, president of the AAML, said:

Going through a divorce always results in heightened levels of personal scrutiny. If you publicly post any contradictions to previously made statements and promises, an estranged spouse will certainly be one of the first people to notice and make use of that evidence. As everyone continues to share more and more aspects of their lives on social networking sites, they leave themselves open to much greater examinations of both their public and private lives in these sensitive situations.

Somewhere, Tony Parker is sitting at a computer, reading this report, and gently nodding his head.

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About Ryan O'Hanlon

Ryan O'Hanlon is the managing editor of the Good Men Project. He used to play soccer and go to college. He's still trying to get over it. You can follow him on Twitter @rwohan.

Comments

  1. I thought this was going to end up being about how many people are (re)connecting with people who are way better for them than their spouses. I know of at least two marriages that have ended because the now-ex wives found their dream lovers from their past on Facebook, and started up what turned out to be the undoing of their marriages.

    When the going gets tough, it will look like nirvana to go back to a simpler time, with a simpler partner, and become that innocent 20-year old again.

    I wonder what we’ll see when those new relationships turn out to be just as full of challenges as the ones they left…

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