Men Drinking, Boys Tormenting, Dogs Barking

Traylor

Elvis Alves reflects on darker aspects of human nature in this ekphrastic (based on a piece of visual art) poem.

Touch: A Letter to Mother

Woman

L. Lamar Wilson writes of a gay son, an ill mother, and their deeply felt intimacy.

Misrata dawn

Misrata

Helen Wing gives voice to the horrors perpetrated on young women and men in the 2011 Libyan uprising.

How to Teach Children About Desire

Duality

Stephen Scott Whitaker raises the uncomfortable yet important subject of one’s children’s burgeoning sexuality.

Body Language

Bath

Kenny Fries recounts an intimate moment, at the intersection of memory and vulnerability.

Mozart in the Morning

Tsarnaev

Writer and teacher Jane Wohl tries to come to terms with the Boston Marathon Bombing in this elegaic poem.

Accident at the Vitamin Factory, 1976

Worker

An injured man is forced to reassess his relationship to family and work in this moving poem from Jia Oak Baker.

Nowhere to Go

Gay shopping

Allen Fraser Clark captures the frustration and desire of young men, eager for sexual expression and frightened by it.

Unspoken at JFK

RSO&I/FE '07'

David Eye offers a moment of horror and a moment of beauty at the airport.

letters to langston #37

Beyonce

Luther Hughes brings together the Harlem Renaissance and contemporary pop/R&B, introducing Langston Hughes to Beyoncé.

Mater, Maritatus

Mater

Dakota Garilli writes of boys, their mothers, and “how we learn /of love.”

No Elegies for Porn Stars

Seen at the scene

Dean Kostos’s newest book, This is Not a Skyscraper, contains many gems. This reflection on a porn watcher’s sense of entitlement to the attention of a neighborhood porn star–“earned by years of yearning”–is one such standout.

Dreamboys

Dreamboy

L. Lamar Wilson illustrates the challenging intersection of childhood, homophobia, and race.

Frankenstein’s Monster

Frankenstein

James Arthur reimagines the classic monster as a fashionable Manhattanite.

Benchmark

Man

Jan Clausen’s remembrance of her father reminds us that memory is complex and grief is never linear.

Doors

Door

Kris Bigalk demonstrates how potent one simple metaphor can be.