Ice Garden

Ice

Dean Kostos expertly weds form and content in this poem–a villanelle–whose use of refrain and repetition reflects an old man’s movement through time and memory.

My Son’s Voice Changed Today

Shaving Cream

There’s nothing quite like a good short poem to punch you in the gut. Joshua Wood’s piece does just that.

Married

Gym

Timothy Liu’s look at sex, gay married life, and cruising is both rough and playful, a celebration of lust that almost hits, but narrowly avoids, a kind of sorrow.

Poem for Saturday

Girl

Justin Hamm offers his own simple philosophy of thanksgiving and celebration in a poem that will ring true for many.

My Last Lover Was

Lover

Jeff Walt captures a moment of loss in a poem that is both stark and lovely.

Rabbits

Water

Lauren Camp’s poem points to the surprise intersection of destruction and tenderness, a place that some men have surely occupied at some point or another.

Counting Change

Moon

Michael T. Young offers a meditation on beauty and value, past and present, via a thoughtful parallel.

Tai Sao?

G-1 COFFIN CARRIER

All Vietnam veterans have stories. Allen Fraser Clark’s involves a child, a game, and a tragedy.

Puberty

Bear

A day in the forest and a shared moment of wonderment bring a father and his teenaged son together.

Bones

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Von Thompson writes of the Pacific Island nation of Palau, haunted by the clash of Japanese and American forces during World War II.

The Fear Mongers

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Dwight Gray brings home the ISIS beheading of journalist James Foley, and does so in a way that challenges cliche and oversimplification.

The Success of Captain Whitaker’s Dress

Belle

To mark Halloween, here’s a poem from Stephen Scott Whitaker about a costume–a costume that is both funny and indicative of how gender affects interactions.

The Moon Over the Verrazano Bridge

Verrazano

Jung Hae Chae’s poem is both an exquisite lyric and an incisive meditation on race and belonging. A must-read.

Your Voice

Answering Machine

Tom Mallouk writes touchingly of a deceased friend and the small bit of impermanence that remains.

An Opening

opening

Kenny Fries writes of injuries both physical and spiritual, and “openings” which are simultaneously literal and metaphoric.

friday evening with your approaching facial hair and my nervous fingers

Shaving

Aimee Herman takes a queer look at what has become a common rite of passage for young men.