Stones and Stars

Stars

Kris Bigalk moves from the earthbound to the cosmic in this devastatingly beautiful lyric poem.

A Minor History of Brooklyn

VIETNAM - OCTOBER 10:  A nattily dressed young couple zip down the road on a motor scooter, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  (Photo by Wilbur E. Garrett/National Geographic/Getty Images)

Tina Cane performs a sleight-of-hand in this quirky poem, gliding between Brooklyn, France, and two different kinds of relationships.

Poetry — Best of the Net Nominations 2015

Typewriter

Poetry Editor Charlie Bondhus has nominated the following six poems for Sundress Press’s 2015 “Best of the Net” awards. Read and enjoy!

The Octogenarian Asks the Feminist Sex Educator

Couple

Alice Isak raises important questions about consent and what it actually looks like and means.

Laundress

Laundress

This companion piece to her earlier-published poem, “Shepherd,” finds Heid E. Erdrich again using the lyric to explore–and question–marital devotion.

Season of Renewal

Storm1

After the storm, Jenifer DeBellis inhabits a quiet yet intense moment of satisfaction.

Driving the Beast Away

Bison1

R.G. Evans offers a poignant meditation on manhood, aging, and libido.

Attrition

Apocalypse3

Helen Wing’s poem is bleak, but probably accurate.

Viewing Vintage Porn

Stryker1

By turns wistful, by turns puckish, David Bergman’s tribute to gay adult film of yesteryear is a fun twist on the language of nostalgia.

Stars–They’re Just Like Us

NASA1

Shevaun Brannigan uses a familiar image in a fresh, stunning, sustained way.

To the Poet Whose Lover Has Died of AIDS

Kiss1

Kenny Fries writes of love, AIDS, and their difficult overlap.

Otherwise

Water1

Lois Roma-Deeley offers an enigmatic look at a husband and a wife who have lived lives “no one thought practical.”

How Will I Know When I Am in a Body?

Meiners1

Nora Meiners writes as the white mother of a biracial son, reflecting on black male bodies and the perils that attend them.

Answering the Call

Sailor1

Laurie Kolp paints a portrait of a hard living man and the nature of inevitability.

Gone Incognito

Lotus1

Faced with a racist pickup line, the speaker of Jia Oak Baker’s poem chooses playfulness over outrage.

I, Robot

Robot1

Joy Ladin offers a bittersweet remembrance of a father who loved and was loved from a distance.