An Opening

opening

Kenny Fries writes of injuries both physical and spiritual, and “openings” which are simultaneously literal and metaphoric.

friday evening with your approaching facial hair and my nervous fingers

Shaving

Aimee Herman takes a queer look at what has become a common rite of passage for young men.

Objective Correlative

Reeses

Borrowing a term from T.S. Eliot, poet and scholar Merrill Cole writes on duality and connection, the link between the poetic, the political…and peanut butter cups.

Elegy for a One-Man Greek Chorus

Tragicomic

Hayden Saunier remembers a beloved friend in this Greek tragedy of a poem.

Lapping Over Us

Dream

Laura Foley’s poem works to come to terms with loss by juxtaposing the language of dreams with one stark, unforgettable image.

Outside

Kiss

“Visibility” is at the heart of Ed Madden’s poem about love, relationships, and same-sex marriage.

Succession

Generations

Alex Gallo-Brown shares the difficult adventures of three generations of men in an Italian-American family.

When I Was Pregnant

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Matthew Lippman’s poem provides a dark yet quirky look at contemporary manhood.

Liberation

Barista

Sweet and sad at the same time, this poem from Jia Oak Baker speaks to age, desire, and a kind of freedom.

Punchline

Aztec

Christopher Stephen Soden explores the uncertainty of queer youth–and perhaps youth in general–in this vivid poem.

Communicado

Phone

Sam Pittman considers the relationship between poetry and more prosaic forms of communication in this father-son poem.

Why It’s OK to State the Obvious (More Often Than Sometimes Performed by Shane Koyczan)

shane

Shane Koyczan nails it once again. Relationships, messy and soft and perplexing and beautiful. A first kiss that tastes like pepper. Love like a nuclear power plant plugged into the sun. And stating the obvious.

Day 0

Prayer

Margaret Rhee elegizes the Gaza dead in a prose poem of remarkable tenderness. Blending the personal and political, she questions “The difference between wound and womb…Palestinian and Israeli…You and me.”

Banana

Banana

In a poem that some will find creepy and others will find darkly funny, Ann Clark reminds us that the people we love often hide secrets.

Anti-Midas

Mudman

Sometimes men get so hung up on a particular definition of “success” that they fail to realize the good they’re doing just by being themselves. J.D. Smith reminds us of this important lesson in a poem that deftly engages the mythic.

The First Shower

Shower

L. Lamar Wilson raises a powerful memory of sameness and difference– a father-son moment that is both tender and sorrowful.