Cake

Sad

L. Lamar Wilson writes of men and rape, survivors and aggressors, in this stark poem.

After Visiting My Brother in Prison

Hide

Justin Jannise explores past and present, inside and outside, in this moving poem of family and uncertainty.

The Power of Poetry in the Classroom

Poetry in the classroom -Martin Knapp

Teacher and poet Kip Zegers examines why poetry is crucial in classrooms…and in life.

Us and Them, 2014

Phone

In this poem, MaryLisa DeDomenicis reminds us of a common stereotype and the human need “to distinguish one’s self.”

Mountain Ash Berries

Horseplay

Ed Harkness writes of “the sting of living” in this fond memory of horseplay with his sons.

The Bet

Dad-Son

Like many great poems, Mike Crossley’s piece about a father’s playful challenge to his son can be understood in many ways.

the short autobiography of a lay

Souq

Jeremy Brunger takes us to a Middle Eastern market and beyond in this lush poem of male desire.

The Snail Poem

Morton

Dakota Garilli’s poem is reminiscent of the old dance between attraction and repulsion–fear of death and fascination with it.

Targets

Target

David Eye’s poem of shooting involves both literal and metaphorical guns.

Why Do You Call Me “Fa**ot”?

bear kiss

Warren Blumenfeld wants to know who is uncomfortable in whose skin? (Here’s a hint, it is not Warren!)

Night Train

Man

Jarrett Neal reflects on the heartbreak and alcoholism that so often attended black men from “the Jim Crow South” in this searing poem.

Who Gets a Second Chance?

second chance

Questioning the myth of justice

Ice Garden

Ice

Dean Kostos expertly weds form and content in this poem–a villanelle–whose use of refrain and repetition reflects an old man’s movement through time and memory.

My Son’s Voice Changed Today

Shaving Cream

There’s nothing quite like a good short poem to punch you in the gut. Joshua Wood’s piece does just that.

Married

Gym

Timothy Liu’s look at sex, gay married life, and cruising is both rough and playful, a celebration of lust that almost hits, but narrowly avoids, a kind of sorrow.

Take the Realness Challenge

realness

How much realness do you have?