I Wish I Could Show You What I See

deserted church

There is wonder and beauty still left in this world if you know how and where to look.

Mater, Maritatus

Mater

Dakota Garilli writes of boys, their mothers, and “how we learn /of love.”

No Elegies for Porn Stars

Seen at the scene

Dean Kostos’s newest book, This is Not a Skyscraper, contains many gems. This reflection on a porn watcher’s sense of entitlement to the attention of a neighborhood porn star–“earned by years of yearning”–is one such standout.

Dreamboys

Dreamboy

L. Lamar Wilson illustrates the challenging intersection of childhood, homophobia, and race.

Frankenstein’s Monster

Frankenstein

James Arthur reimagines the classic monster as a fashionable Manhattanite.

Benchmark

Man

Jan Clausen’s remembrance of her father reminds us that memory is complex and grief is never linear.

Doors

Door

Kris Bigalk demonstrates how potent one simple metaphor can be.

Super Mouse

super-mouse

Spoon Jackson, and the whole cell block, battle a mouse in the hole.

When You’re Thirteen

Locker

Jarrett Neal considers that familiar rite of passage from childhood to adolescence–the boys’ locker room.

The Principal

Walrus

RG Evans illustrates how adults can be bullied as well; and how they can come out of it triumphant.

Poetry is Truly in the Margins

poetry-is-truly-in-the-margins

Will it ever get out?

Family Romance

Fridge

Timothy Liu writes of addiction, resentment, and family secrets.

How Could I Not See

Table

Lauren Camp recounts a woman’s tender moment with her father-in-law, bonding over Emily Dickinson.

Home

Island

Bill Trüb presents a poem replete with striking–and eerie–imagery.

The Readers (after Robert Hayden)

Reading

Recalling Robert Hayden’s classic poem “Those Winter Sundays,” Philip Clark presents his own remembrance of a father and his sacrifices.

All the Men Went

Prism

In this remembrance of a grandfather, Charles Bane Jr. writes of coal mines and light, death and the sublime.