A Patriotic Citizen of Baltimore Responds to Critics

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What fear mongering in the media doesn’t show us about protests and unrest in Baltimore City

Finding the Courage to Talk About Violence

Finding the Courage by Sasha Maksymenko

In the wake of Baltimore’s riots, Raoul Wieland explores the nature and implications of violence and the social disconnection that inflames it.

After Baltimore This Week, What Happens Now?

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The recent unrest in Baltimore is certainly an important event, but it probably won’t lead to large-scale changes anytime soon. ___ Lots of people have been talking about the civil disturbances that rocked the city of Baltimore this week, and not without good reason. They clearly are connected to the recent controversies surrounding instances of […]

Race, Exclusion and Crowds

Racism Exclusion and Crowds

Alex Barnett asks, “How do we get to a place where it is the overwhelming rule (not the exception) that the few in the crowd who are different than the majority can feel comfortable and at ease and be accepted?”

How Philadelphia Mayoral Candidates of Color Envision Community Policing 

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Men of color, all vying to be the 99th mayor of Philadelphia, expound upon their vision for community policing.

‘Cherry Spoon Bridge to Nowhere’ Slam Poet Guante

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Award winning spoken word poet Guante on race, privilege, art and Minneapolis.

On Staying Alive Despite Being Black

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LeRon Barton on “The Talk”, and the sobering idea that murdering a black man is almost legal.

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard to Talk to White People About Racism

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Dr. Robin DiAngelo explains why white people implode when talking about race.

Photo of the Day: A Stark Mix of Race and Class

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Sometimes a picture just says it all.

To The Lady Who Called My Toddler a ‘Thug’

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“I knew he would inevitably face discrimination. What I didn’t realize was how early in my son’s life he would be stereotyped, labeled and feared.”