What a Eunuch Teaches Us About Manliness

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About Brian Reinholz

Brian Reinholz is a husband and the father of a shiny new baby. He believes the Bible is the inspired word of God and is relevant today, as opposed to a dusty old book of fairy tales. He works as a client services manager and likes playing tennis and strategy games.

Comments

  1. There’s no mention of Daniel actually being castrated in the Bible, so you have to jump through some scriptural hoops in order to assume that he was. Not everyone’s willing to jump through those hoops. Perhaps nitpicky, but there it is.

    • Brian Reinholz says:

      Good point – the term eunuch doesn’t necessarily mean that he was castrated. But as a slave he was stripped of many of our stereotypical definitions of ‘manhood’ – he didn’t have the freedom to be fruitful and multiply whether for a physiological reason, or because of his circumstance. Thanks for keeping me honest.

  2. wellokaythen says:

    No need to read between the lines of biblical stories.

    There are lots of better-documented historical examples of eunuchs being powerful, brilliantly successful men and well-respected leaders of other men. The great Chinese admiral Zheng He (aka Cheng Ho), for example, led the largest navy in the history of the world up to that point (1400’s). A better leader and better navigator than Columbus ever was. He was nicknamed “three treasures” because he carried with him a pouch containing the preserved remains of his two testicles and part of his penis. That’s pretty badass, in my estimation.

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