Blood Spattered

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Comments

  1. Julie Gillis says:

    Moved. Truly moved.

  2. Peter Houlihan says:

    That’s really inspiring, I’d be interested to read your book when it comes out.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] cities, the only realistic way to make a living is to participate in the distribution of drugs (Blood Splattered). Because it is illegal, this requires gang-style violence to enforce selling territories and [...]

  2. [...] the preponderance of rape committed by individual men, is wrong. And, when I say that I believe treating every black man as a criminal just because there are one million of them behind bars is just as abhorrent as treating all men as [...]

  3. [...] scholar Michelle Alexander on Fresh Air to day and thinking about Martin Luther King, about my friend Julio Medina and his experience in Sing Sing, and about all that we have talked about here on GMP with regard to [...]

  4. [...] The first time I met Julio Medina, we sat in his office in Harlem and talked for several hours. That conversation became the essay, “Blood Splattered.” [...]

  5. [...] the CEO of Pepsi? Similarly how does a headline announcing the stupidity of men show respect for Julio Medina or Michael Kamber, both of whom are heroic men we have profiled here at [...]

  6. [...] by the story of how Julio founded his business by realizing what he was good at as I was about the story of the pool of blood in Sing Sing. A story Tom had told me the first day I met him. Yet, I disagree with Tom that there was anything [...]

  7. [...] Blood Spattered – Julio Medina explains how 15 years in Sing Sing taught him to take responsibility for his own life, to make the prison a less violent place and to help those coming out of prison start new, healthy lives. [...]

  8. [...]  –Julio Medina “Blood Splattered” [...]

  9. [...] Blood Spattered by Julio Medina [...]

  10. [...] Dads go to prison (and sometimes change for the better) [...]

  11. [...] I sit down with Julio Medina, who spent a decade inside Sing Sing, or David Sanfacon, who is home with 6 month-old twins, I want [...]

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