Call for Bloggers, Vloggers and Editors: A Conversation About Men

photo by mayeesherr

We’re having a conversation about what it means to be a man in the 21st century. It’s the conversation no one else is having. And we’re hoping you’ll join. 

We’re looking for people want to talk about men, and want to better understand the rapidly changing roles that are happening in the 21st century. If writing or creating videos (or any kind of multi-media) about the trials, the tribulations, and the joys of manhood appeals to you, we’d love for you to become a regular blogger. You will get a terrific platform (the total network is steadily growing, but right now gets almost 8 million pageviews a month) and an opportunity to help shape not only The Good Men Project itself, but the conversation about men in the world. There really is no limit to what you can blog about, as long as it relates in some way to things that men in today’s modern world care about (And trust us, that’s a whole lot of things). We are also looking for humor, insights, and raw honest truths. But mostly we’re looking for your own unique voice. First person narratives that lead to some deeper, universal understandings are always welcome here. Check out our about page if you want to learn more about who we are and how we’ve grown.

Virtually any well-written post about anything you can imagine that relates to men in the 21st century is something we’d consider publishing.

If you, or someone you know, is interested in becoming a blogger, vlogger or editor at The Good Men Project, please email Lisa Hickey at [email protected] with a short email about what interests you most about this conversation. We’ll want to know who you are, what you want to contribute, and how you expect to do it. Some sense of your writing (and life) experience would help too. You will need to show that you have good ideas, the capacity for brutal honesty and, hopefully, a sense of humor. You will need a social media platform—be prepared to tell us your twitter following, facebook fans, g+ profile and any other places you have a social media footprint. (Redditors get brownie points). We are happy to help you grow your network—in fact, one of the benefits to working with our platform is that you can expect to double your network size if you combine our platform with your own efforts towards growth. While standalone contributions are not paid, those who contribute on a set schedule or are Editors for The Good Men Project are offered a a percentage of the average revenue we get per pageview generated.

photo: mayeesherr / flickr

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Comments

  1. Are ou looking also bloggers outsider your country? I’m Located in Spain.

  2. Does one have to be a man for this? I am intrigued by the possibilities.

    • Joanna Schroeder says:

      We do have female writers who are writing about issues that affect men. In For the Love of Men, women write about the men who have affected their lives or who make their lives better, in Raising Boys both women and men talk about raising sons… There are also females writing news stories that affect men and are about men and so on.

      Let us know if you have a pitch!

      • What is For the Love of Men? ( I searched on this site and found nothing; I searched on Google and found sites with lots of men without chest hair posing in baths.) I’m asking because from your description it sounds intriguing. I started a blog a couple of years ago called Lessons From Men. It was about honouring men, mainly by acknowledging the life lessons that the men I know have taught me. Unfortunately, I took it down due to a vitriolic personal reaction from a female I barely knew. I’m annoyed at myself – it was a good blog. I’m going to dig out my archives and pitch.

      • Good Men project is so full of a great variety of conversations. I appreciate the depth and the opportunity to participate in meaningful dialogues that are hard to find in our society.

  3. My mind is “Cluttered”. I am 59 years old, have been in the British army and have a very chequered background. I found this link via my twitter account NEWHACK58 and will send my “Pitch” to you next week when I can. Thanks

  4. Jackie Morrison says:

    Hi Lisa, just sent you a pitch

  5. I remain interested: how do I go about it?
    Graeme

  6. Hey Lisa, I would love the opportunity to write for this site. I tweeted you a link to my latest post from my blog. What do I need to do to sign up?

  7. You lost me at “unpaid”.

  8. Lisa, I emailed you! I’m super interested in contributing.

  9. Lisa, I sent my request (pitch?) weeks ago. Since I have received no response, I’m not sure whether you even received it. I’m assuming you reply to everyone who takes the time to send a request? I hope so, because then I’ll know that for whatever reason you didn’t get mine.

    • Lisa Hickey says:

      Hey Lawrence!

      Thanks for the follow-up. I do try to get back to everyone personally. I know we had a really large group of people respond, and then we had a big burst of traffic, so I haven’t yet been able to get back to me. But if you want to re-send your email, I will look at it and put it at the top of my list.

      thanks again, looking forward to seeing your pitch.

      Lisa

      • Thanks Lisa,

        Thanks for you reply on here and I will send you an email over the weekend. One of my concerns is that an email gets lost in some folder before you get to see it. That happens occasionally. I recently sent a query letter to a book reviewer, someone I was really excited about approaching. I’m sure glad I did a follow-up – the first time the query got redirected – now she’s doing the review!

        Finally, at the very least a medal for bravery should be in order, sending such an email for the Monday morning queue – or is it a badge of stupidity? Either way, I’ll make it on the lighter side . . . maybe then, at least for a few minutes, Monday will feel like late Friday afternoon?

        Have a great weekend!

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